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Performance
Crossing DMZ


Performance
Digging wishes


Video
Digging wishes


Crossing DMZ

For her first trip in South Korea, Sarah Trouche asks the unavoidable question of the rapprochement between the North and the South. She goes along DMZ, a demilitarized zone extending for four kilometers which separate both territories. That is a no man’s land plenty with grids, with barbed wires and walls, where people come and collect themselves. They put ribbons corresponding symbolically to wishes or thoughts sent to their fellows living on the other side of the border. By exploring the borders of this protected extremist zone, the artist discovers the maritime border. The west Korea is subject to big tides which generate large area of muds. At low tide, both countries are practically linked by the mud, without any physical border separating them. These muddy zones are closely monitored. In the mud one can find imposing metallic anchors which are arranged to prevent the boats from docking. The artist discreetly goes into the mud to be able to go as closer as possible to North Korea. She buried colored ribbons so they can be discovered by the inhabitants of the North. Then her body is displayed, endangered in order to mean a common will of getting together. The body covered with mud looks like the junction between both banks. She keeps her action in Paris (Glamorama #9-2012), where she shows herself dense cloud, her skin covered with a brownish painting. Her hair is harnessed thick extensions; it ended by several metallic anchors. The body is the toy of a physical twinge, wobbling between tension and resistance. It is felt to better underline the disconnectedness of two separated countries which tend to merge again.

Julie Crenn

 

 

 

 

Performance
Action for Korea